An argument in favor of unisex basic training in military

Actions on the part of organizational leaders to demonstrate and implement these cultural paradigms not only reduce incidents of hazing but also create a productive learning environment. And just to even consider that someone can die, changes the equation of how obligated they are.

For example, recruits are required to run long distances while carrying heavy loads of equipment during basic training—a physical capability that is likely to be called upon in a combat environment. In either case, the recruit considered unfit for service would be weeded out through hazing.

Today, this behavior—in which an oftentimes-more-powerful individual or group uses that power to force less powerful people to accept risk, humiliation, or abuse as a form of punishment or rite of passage—is recognized as hazing [5]. Thus, the draft should not exist erring on the side of free will.

Not only do these circumstances suffice to prepare students for medical careers, but they also effectively socialize individuals and create camaraderie and commitment within cohorts.

Drill instructors acted on a sense of duty to strip recruits of their old civilian lives, including their dignity, in order to prepare them for military careers. Initially, harassment was implemented in military contexts because of its purported benefits to the larger organization.

Like Soldiers, doctors are required to apply extensive amounts of procedural and declarative knowledge in a fast-paced, high-stakes environment. Shared stressful experiences have been shown to foster cohesion among group members [].

In this effort, the medical community can look to military practices and experiences in erasing hazing from both the training environment and the overall culture. Recruits are still subjected to a number of arduous tasks and conditions. In basic training, that common stress was created in the form of hazing and harassment from drill instructors.

And historically the rich and well-connected have not served. Derogatory terms, punitive or excessive physical activities, and any abusive or violent physical contact are now expressly forbidden and punishable by the Uniform Code of Military Justice UCMJ [20].

The military has since recognized that the physical, emotional, and mental hardships inherent in basic training are already significant.

That said, the military is necessary because of all the threats any nation faces, including America, just naturally. This culture is one in which instructors are viewed as mentors, not disciplinarians; mental toughness is demonstrated by consistently high performance, not endurance of harassment; and mistakes are viewed as opportunities for growth, not humiliation.

Yes, the military has lots of noncombat roles, but someone has to fill the combat ones. Medical education has also historically used hazing as a rite of passage for students and resident physicians [6, 7] but is now seeking to rid programs of such socially accepted abuse.

Hence, drill instructors are expected to enforce these activities, but only to prepare recruits for the tasks and objectives they will be faced with in the course of their military duties. This resulted in new recruits developing a strong commitment to their fellow trainees and the military itself—according to the theory of cognitive dissonance [13], new members would justify their unpleasant experiences by increasing their valuation of the group [14].

However, these tasks directly relate to legitimate training objectives and give recruits a realistic preview of the challenges of a military career [14]. Drill instructors no longer have full autonomy in how they conduct training or discipline recruits, and methods of training that avoid hazing are stressed to prospective drill instructors in the drill instructor school.

Third, hazing was viewed as an effective means of weeding out those who were either too weak for or not fully committed to a military career [15]. In an attack, the government may have to resume the draft.

Like Soldiers in basic training, medical interns will experience extensive rigors during their residencies, including long hours, overwhelming amounts of information, and very high costs of failure. A culture of mistreatment not only creates a hostile learning environment, but also causes breakdowns in trust and communication that can jeopardize patient safety [25].

The military continues to work towards eliminating hazing in basic training and continues to make great strides in this effort.

AMA Journal of Ethics

Today, the common interests and identity cultivated during basic training are built on a foundation of socialization, cohesion, and commitment without the cruelty of ritualized abuse from instructors.

It has been used to enforce a particular standard or code of conduct or to initiate new members of a group [5]. Due to these taxing requirements, it is not surprising that the medical community has also implicitly or explicitly used hazing as a means to weed out unfit interns and sufficiently prepare the remaining students for the rigors of a difficult career ahead.

It begins, however, with a commitment by those at the top of the organization. Despite the arguments in favor of hazing noted above, the eradication of hazing has not diminished the socialization, camaraderie, or commitment of new recruits. Nevertheless, hazing has long been a part of the culture of clinical medical education and residency programs, much as it was a part of the military culture.

If they want the honor, service members should receive lots of benefits for their service. Specifically, hazing was seen to serve three functions—socialization, cohesion-building, and weeding out those unfit or unwilling to serve.

Severe mistreatment on the part of instructors is recorded as early as the beginning of the twentieth century at the United States Military Academy [1] and continued well into the modern era.

But writing policy is not enough; leaders must implement policy with a strict zero-tolerance approach. Submit The issue is complex God Bless those who serve in the American military.

In addition to ridding training programs of a culture of hazing, environments like the military and medical community will also benefit from building a new culture of supportive learning and psychological safety. However, it is becoming clear that the hazing students receive when beginning their residency can be dangerous and unwarranted.Despite the arguments in favor of hazing noted above, the eradication of hazing has not diminished the socialization, camaraderie, or commitment of new recruits.

The military has since recognized that the physical, emotional, and mental hardships inherent in basic training are already significant. For many, the goal of Basic Training quickly becomes simply making it to the end.

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Since the last war, whenever the subject has been debated in the United States or Great Britain, the advocates of a compulsory training system have usually argued that it would achieve three advantages: increased military effectiveness, benefits to the individual, and general benefits to the state.

The arguments may be briefly analyzed.

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An argument in favor of unisex basic training in military
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